Activity Set 26

Play

Which type?

Age Range: 9 to 14 year olds

Materials: A variety of musical styles to listen to, sound system.

Directions:

  1. Talk to the players about all the different styles of music that exist, not only in our own culture, but all around the world. See how many they can think of, such as: classical, contemporary, jazz, popular, rock, heavy metal, reggae, soul, blues, folk, religious, instrumental, film music, cartoon music, opera, musicals, Scottish bagpipes, South American flutes, Spanish guitar, Flamenco, Indian, Chinese, Aboriginal, African, Maori, Hawaiian and so on. Play as many examples of the different musical styles as you can, especially concentrating on the less well-known varieties.
  2. Now, divide the players into four teams, and ask them to sit down and listen while you play a piece of music.
  3. The first team to call out the correct style wins a point. If a player calls out a wrong answer, he scores a minus point.
  4. Keep playing until as many examples of musical styles as possible have been identified, and see which team has scored the most points.

Write

Instructions: How to Tie a Shoelace

Report: What did Aristarchus and Copernicus have in common?

Think

General Knowledge Quiz #26

See if you know the answers to these questions. If you don’t, find out from an encyclopaedia.

Science

  1. What is the difference between a meteor and a meteorite?
  2. What is the difference between an asteroid and a comet?

English

  1. British and American English are different. Give the British equivalent of these American words: cookie, movie, fall, gasoline, apartment, wrench, railroad, skillet, automobile, hood, trunk, eraser, faucet, flashlight, streetcar, trash, drugstore, fender, vacation, candy, sidewalk, freight train, suspenders, soda, brook, thumb tack, elevator.

Music

  1. Which great composer wrote 373 orchestral works, 227 songs, and 98 sacred and dramatic pieces before he died at just thirty-five years of age?

 

Finished? Click to check your answers.
Science
  1. A meteor is incoming matter from Space that burns up in the Earth’s atmosphere before reaching the ground. A meteorite survives the fall and actually hits the ground.
  2. Asteroids are rocky planetoids which orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. Comets are icy dust balls that have elliptical orbits that take them way out beyond the orbits of the planets. On their return towards the Sun, some of their ice melts, creating tails of vapour streaming out behind them.
English
  1. biscuit, film, autumn, petrol, flat, spanner, railway, frying pan, car, bonnet, boot, rubber, tap, torch, tram, rubbish, chemist, bumper bar, holiday, sweets, pavement, goods train, braces, soft drink, stream, drawing pin, lift.
Music
  1. Mozart.

Activity Set 25

Play

Which plate?

Materials: None

Directions

  1. Ask the players to lie down on the floor and tell them that they are all Tectonic Plates lying on the Earth’s surface.
  2. Choose one child to be the Geologist, ask him to look carefully at where the Tectonic Plates are located, and then send him out of the room, while you select one Plate to move to another spot on the floor.
  3. When the Geologist is called back in, he has two guesses to work out which Plate has moved.
  4. Let a few players take turns being the Geologist, and repeat the game for as long as the players are having fun.

Write

Book Review: Describe the theme, plot, setting and characters of your favourite book, and say why you enjoyed the story so much.

Report: Captain James Cook and His Voyages

Think

General Knowledge Quiz #25

See if you know the answers to these questions. If you don’t, find out from an encyclopaedia or atlas.

Geography

  1. What do these areas have in common: African Savannah, South American Pampas, North American Prairie, Eurasian Steppe?

History

  1. Where were these civilisations situated: The Aztecs, The Incas, The Mayans?
  2. Why was the Great Wall of China built?
  3. When was it built?
  4. Name some Chinese inventions.

Maths

  1. Find the surface area of a right circular cylinder with a radius of 20 inches and a height of 40 inches?

 

Finished? Click to check your answers.
Geography
  1. They are all grasslands
History
  1. Mexico, Peru, Yucatan Peninsula (Southern Mexico)
  2. To keep out the aggressive, Mongol invaders
  3. 2,200 years ago
  4. compass, fireworks, silk, abacus, seismograph
Maths
  1. 7,536 square inches.

Activity Set 24

Play

Around the world

Age Range: All age groups

Materials

  • 8 to 10 pictures of famous world landmarks and landscapes from magazines
  • masking tape
  • 1 compass
  • 1 pencil and 1 sheet of paper per team.

Directions

  1. Set up a compass trail through the woods or park with pictures of famous landmarks and landscapes attached to trees at various places around the course. At the start of the trail and at each landmark or landscape, leave instructions containing a compass bearing and distance in paces to the next point.
  2. Divide the players into teams and give each group a pencil, sheet of paper and a compass. If possible, have a Leader with each team for supervision.
  3. To play the game, the teams should set off at different intervals to follow the trail, identify the landmarks, or state the countries in which each landscape might be found, and then return home with their lists of answers.
  4. Once all the teams are home, see who has identified the most places correctly. They are the winners.

Landmarks could be structures such as The Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, The Statue of Liberty, The Taj Mahal, The Golden Gate Bridge and The Great Wall of China, while landscapes could include sand dunes to represent the Sahara Desert, snow to represent Antarctica, Ayres Rock (Uluru) to represent Australia and rainforest to represent the Amazon Jungle.

Write

Interview: An Interview with the Devil!

Story, ending with: I’ll never do that again!

Think

General Knowledge Quiz #24

See if you know the answers to these questions. If you don’t, find out from an encyclopaedia.

Science

  1. What is the difference between a solar and lunar eclipse?
  2. Which is hotter: Mercury or Venus?

English

  1. Are these Shakespearean plays comedies or tragedies: Hamlet, King Lear,
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, The Taming of the Shrew, Othello?

Art

  1. Where are these famous art galleries: The Louvre, The Hermitage,
    The Guggenheim, The Tate, The Smithsonian, The Van Gogh Museum?

 

Finished? Click to check your answers.
Science
  1. In a solar eclipse, the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, whereas in a lunar eclipse, the Earth passes between the Sun and the Moon.
  2. Venus
English
  1. Tragedy, Tragedy, Comedy, Tragedy, Comedy, Tragedy, Tragedy, Comedy, Comedy, Tragedy
Art
  1. France, Russia, U.S.A., England, U.S.A., The Netherlands.

Activity Set 16

Play

Home Safety Test

Age Range: 7 to 10 year olds

Materials: Set up a kitchen (or other room) with dangers for the players to observe and write down.

1 piece of paper and 1 pencil per player.

Directions: Send the players into the kitchen in teams, one group at a time.

Give them one or two minutes to look around, and then call them out to write down the dangers they saw.

Send the next team in, while the others are writing down their answers.

The team with the most correct answers wins the game.

Dangers to set up could be such things as:

  • Saucepan handle pointing out from the hotplate.
  • Iron resting face down on the ironing board.
  • Electric heater or toaster near overhanging towels.
  • Electric jug cord hanging over the edge of the bench top for a toddler to pull on.
  • Frayed electric cord on an appliance.
  • Pills open on the bench.
  • Poisons in an open or unlocked cupboard.
  • Matches left to play with.
  • Sharp knives handy to toddlers.
  • Coffeepot on the edge of a table.
  • Too many plugs in a power outlet.
  • Sharp lid from an opened can left on the table.

Write

Logbook Entry: Imagine that you are an aeroplane pilot who has just had a near collision in mid-air. Write down details in your flight logbook of what happened and why.

Opinion: The Arts give people enjoyment and entertainment, but the Sciences help to give us safer, more comfortable, more convenient, and better lives. Therefore, the Sciences are more important than the Arts.

Do you agree or disagree with this view? Why or why not?

Think

General Knowledge Quiz #16

See if you know the answers to these questions. If you don’t, find out from an encyclopaedia.

Science

  1. What is the difference between a dyke and a sill?
  2. What is a tectonic plate?

English

  1. Correct the mistake in this sentence and explain the fault: It looks like it’s going to rain.
  2. Correct the mistakes in this sentence: Its a real nice affect when a rainbow spreads it’s colours across the sky.

Art

  1. Which famous Dutch graphic artist specialised in drawing optical illusions?

 
Finished? Click to check your answers.

Science
  1. A dyke is an igneous intrusion that cuts across rock layers, whereas a sill is an igneous intrusion that runs between two different rock layers.
  2. An area of land which floats around on a slowly moving current of magma.
English
  1. It looks as though it’s going to rain. “Like” mustn’t be used as a conjunction. It is a preposition.
  2. It’s a really nice effect when a rainbow spreads its colours across the sky. [Note that “colours” is the correct spelling in British and Australian English; in American English, it should be “colors”.]
Art
  1. M. C. Escher

Activity Set 15

Play

Photo Relay

Age Range: All age groups

Materials: Photos of the local area, taken by a Leader and mounted onto poster paper, with a number next to each photo for identification.

1 sheet of paper per team, with photo identification numbers down the left hand side for the answers, plus 1 pencil per team.

Directions: Stand the players in their teams, in relay lines, with an answer sheet and pencil.

Stick the photos on the wall at the other end of the hall.

On “Go”, the players take it in turns to run down and look at one photo that they can identify. They must also remember the number of the photo, so that when they run back, they can record the photo number and its identity.

When this is done, the next players in each team run down to the photos to do the same.

The first team home and seated, with the most answers correct, are the winners.

Write

Design: Design a ‘Car of the Future’, draw it and label its parts. Then write a paragraph about its special features.

Poster: Design a poster for a country fair that is coming to your town soon.

Think

General Knowledge Quiz #15

See if you know the answers to these questions. If you don’t, find out from an encyclopaedia or atlas.

Geography

  1. What is the name of the little country between France and Spain?
  2. What do Sicily, Corsica, Crete, Malta, the Balearic Islands and Sardinia all have in common?
  3. Name the rivers which run through these cities: London, Paris, Vienna, Bonn.

History

  1. Who was Guy Fawkes?
  2. Which English king was beheaded by his people?

Maths

  1. Without using a calculator, what is the volume of a cylinder with a radius of 2 feet and a height of two yards?
  2. How much is infinity minus ten?
  3. How much is the speed of light plus one thousand kilometres per second?

 
Finished? Click to check your answers.

Geography
  1. Andorra
  2. All islands in the Mediterranean Sea
  3. The Thames, The Seine, The Danube, The Rhine
History
  1. A member of a Catholic gang who tried to blow up the English Parliament and kill King James 1 in 1605.
  2. Charles 1
Maths
  1. 75.36 cubic feet
  2. Infinity
  3. The speed of light (~300,000 km./sec.)